pregnancy, tooth pain, tooth decay, bleeding gums, pregnancy tumor, scaling, pregnancy care, pregnancy diet, dental hygienist, x-rays,

What are the dental problems during pregnancy?

Pregnancy is the period of varied hormonal levels. This can affect your oral health in many ways. The most common dental problems during pregnancy can be

Are dental X-Rays safe during pregnancy?

Dental X-Rays have very low radiation exposure and does not cause any damage to the mother or the baby. Your dentist will give you safety aprons and also neck collars to protect you from the radiation. Doing a dental X-ray can be safe during the second trimester with the safety precautions. However, your dentist can give you a choice on taking x-rays during the first and the third trimester. Routine dental X-rays can be postponed until after the baby is born. In a dental emergency, your dentist can go ahead and make an x-ray.

Can a tooth decay harm my unborn baby?

You will have changes in your body and the mouth as well during pregnancy. Hormonal changes increases the acidity in your mouth, making you prone to cavities. Particularly, in the third trimester increased body response can lead to increased accumulation of plaque in the mouth. Poor oral hygiene of the mother during pregnancy can result in a low weight and/or preterm baby. You can pass on the cavity causing bacteria to your unborn baby. This can cause dental problems in your child later in life.

Why is my gums red and swollen in pregnancy?

Hormonal changes in pregnancy ca alter your body response to plaque deposits on the teeth. However, pregnancy itself does not cause gum problems. Poor oral hygiene is the predominant cause go bleeding gums. In severe cases of gingivitis during pregnancy, you can have swelling in the gums. These are called ‘Pregnancy Tumors’. This condition will resolve once the offending agent ( Plaque, debris or tartar ) is removed. So you have to follow good dental hygiene habits during your pregnancy.

Can I get a cavity filled during pregnancy?

Pregnancy is time of joy and excitement for the expectant mother, but also comes with the added responsibility of keeping ¬†good oral hygiene. Dental treatment procedures are safe during pregnancy. Your dentist can safely do the following procedures during pregnancy…..

  • Dental X-rays
  • Tooth fillings
  • Teeth cleanings
  • Tooth removal
  • Using local anesthesia
  • RCT ( Root Canal Treatment)

However, talk to your dentist about your concerns before starting your treatment. Your dentist will help you and guide you through the procedures.

What can I do for tooth pain in pregnancy?

A tooth pain during pregnancy can be tiring. If you have a severe tooth pain that’s not going away, then see your dentist immediately. Your dentist will prescribe meds to relieve pain or perform any emergency treatment if necessary. However, if you cannot reach out to your dentist or the pain is manageable you can try some of these home remedies

  • Luke warm salt water rinsing
  • Cold compress to the cheek area to reduce inflammation
  • Clove pods that can be crushed and placed in the painful tooth
  • Mild over the counter pain killers

Does tooth decay cause miscarriage?

Studies have shown that women who have tooth problems (periodontal disease) are more likely to give birth prematurely, have babies with a low birth weight, and possibly even more likely to miscarry.

But does that mean that tooth problems cause pregnancy complications? It’s possible. Tooth decay bacteria could plausibly secrete some kind of yet undiscovered substance that triggers preterm labour. But there are other equally plausible reasons why there might be a link. For example, smoking increases the risk of both tooth decay and premature birth, as does having diabetes. Women with tooth decay might lack adequate dental coverage, which could mean they have inadequate health care coverage, and thus that they do not get care that might otherwise prevent premature birth.

With these alternate explanations, tooth decay could simply mean a woman has increased risk for premature birth and not that her tooth decay was what caused her baby’s premature birth. Thus, tooth decay would be a risk factor for premature birth but not necessarily a cause of premature birth.

 

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